Accounting for Lawyers

In this course students learn why financial accounting is a system for measuring and communicating the outcomes of business activities to parties outside the firm. The purposes of this course are to: (1) provide students with a basic understanding of the concepts and principles (i.e., the jargon) underlying financial accounting practices; (2) make students comfortable with financial data (in particular, opening a 10K or annual report); (3) enable students to have a conversation with accountants; and (4) provide students with the technical tools and references to analyze how a particular transaction affects a firm's financial statements.

CERT 901
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
Credits: 3

Administrative Law

This course is an introduction to the law of the administrative state—to the constitutional, statutory and judge-made rules governing what agencies may do, the procedures they must follow, and how they can be held to account. Topics include mechanisms for control of agencies by the legislative and executive branches; the constitutional basis for, and limits on, governance by agencies; the availability and effects of judicial review over agency action; and the features of agency rulemaking and adjudication.

BAR 901
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
Credits: 3

Advanced Appellate Advocacy

The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to be effective appellate lawyers, in any practice setting as well as in moot court competitions. This upper-level advanced skills course focuses on appellate theory, standard of review, advanced appellate brief writing, and the art of appellate oral argument. The course is designed to build upon the legal research and writing skills learned in the 1L curriculum; to hone and refine writing, research, and oral advocacy skills; and to develop the judgment necessary to be exceptional appellate advocates. Students will work with a partner to prepare a simulated appeal, and will be responsible for analyzing a record on appeal, developing core themes, telling a persuasive story, crafting persuasive arguments, and presenting those stories and arguments in both an appellate brief and in an oral argument. Student work will culminate in a final appellate brief and a series of oral arguments.

EXPSK 901
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N
Credits: 2

Advanced Clinic

Students who have successfully completed a clinic course may be eligible to apply for Advanced Clinic, with faculty approval. This second-semester clinic course is designed to significantly advance the student’s knowledge of the subject matter area studied in the first semester of clinic and to expand students’ knowledge of areas of practice in other clinics. Class sessions are devoted to case rounds discussions, and students take significant responsibility in crafting their own learning agendas. Acceptance to this course is limited and only permitted with faculty approval.

EXPCL 905
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
Credits: 4

Advanced Criminal Procedure

This course examines the constitutional, statutory and rule-based issues that arise in the formal processing of a criminal case. Subject include the decision to charge, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury and preliminary hearing, joinder and severance, bail and pretrial release, discovery, plea bargaining and guilty pleas, speedy trial, jury composition and selection, pre-trial publicity, confrontation, cross-examination and the privilege against self-incrimination.

CERT 902
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
Credits: 3

Advanced Federal Income Taxation

This course examines the treatment of those taxation principles applicable to investment and business operations applicable to all taxpayers from a perspective that emphasizes tax planning and tax avoidance.
BAR 902
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
Credits: 3

Advanced Torts

This course focuses on torts not involving physical injury, with substantive and procedural coverage of claims for misrepresentation, defamation, invasion of privacy, interference with contract, and injurious falsehood, along with affirmative defenses to these causes of action. These areas have increased in importance due to the emergence of electronic communications resulting in potential liability.
BAR 903
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
Credits: 2

Advocacy I

This course introduces the fundamental skills of trial advocacy applicable in civil and criminal trials in any jurisdiction. In keeping with the theory that trial advocacy is best learned by "doing," each student will conduct written and oral exercises concerning the various stages of the trial process-pleadings, pretrial motions, discovery, settlement negotiations, trial preparation, jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination of lay witnesses, examination of expert witnesses, trial motions, and closing arguments. Students are able to evaluate their own progress through viewing videotapes of their performances. The class meets jointly for lectures, while the oral trial exercises are conducted in small sections.
EXPSK 902
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N
Credits: 4

Advocacy II

Every week the entire class meets for a lecture and demonstration session, and also breaks into small group courtroom section meetings during which every student will present a trial exercise. The goals of the course are 1) to improve confidence in public speaking, 2) to learn how to prepare documents that conform to multiple sources of rules, and 3) to implement the unique protocol for factual, as opposed to legal, persuasion.

EXPSK 903
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N
Credits: 3

Agricultural Law

This course will survey agricultural law issues including labor issues, land and water use, and food animal production and welfare. In addition, the course will focus heavily on the regulation of food production, food safety and food labeling. Finally, the course will review the emerging agriculture of medical cannabis and industrial hemp production.

ELECT 901
Credits: 3